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PhD Defence Gabriel Pereira: Struggling with Algorithmic Seeing: Hegemonic Computer Vision and Antagonistic Practices

Info about event

Time

Thursday 9 December 2021,  at 10:00 - 13:00

Thursday 9 December 2021 at 10:00 CEST Gabriel Pereira, will be defending his dissertation

The defence is public, and everybody is welcome; the defence, scheduled for a max. of three hours, will be held in English.

Venue Aarhus University, Tåsingegade 3, Building 1441-112, Auditorium 2, 8000 Aarhus C.

 

Assessment committee:

- Anthony McCosker, Associate Professor, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Melbourne, Australia

- Nanna Bonde Thylstrup, Associate Professor, Copenhagen Business School, DK  Søren Pold, Associate Professor, School of Communication and Culture – Digital Design and Information Studies, Aarhus University, DK (Chair)

Main supervisor:

- Christian Ulrik Andersen, Associate Professor, School of Communication and Culture – Digital Design and Information Studies, Aarhus University

Co-supervisor:

- Winnie Soon, Associate Professor, School of Communication and Culture – Digital Design and Information Studies, Aarhus University

- Annette Markham, Professor, Digital Ethnography Research Center, RMIT University

 

The defence proceeding will be chaired by Iben Have, Associate Professor, Media Studies, Aarhus University

The dissertation will be available to borrow for reading before the defence in a digital version. Please contact Gabriel Pereira by email gpereira@cc.au.dk in this respect before before 8 December 2021 at 12:00 CEST

Abstract:

This thesis is concerned with the burgeoning forms of machine seeing represented by Computer Vision: an umbrella term for contemporary applications of Machine Learning and AI that carry out different forms of image recognition/analysis and pattern extraction to create actionable intelligence from images and videos (e.g., summarization, categorization, moderation). My goal is investigating and critiquing how Computer Vision operates, what kind of power structures it enables, and how it may become infrastructural in our everyday lives. I aim to do this in order to explore how it is in fact not a neutral operation, but one full of uncertainties, contentions, and politics which allow us to imagine potential alternatives.