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The Department of Digital Design and Information Studies is one of the strongest academic IT environments in Europe and attracts visiting scholars and PhD students from all over the world. We focus on information technology as a feature of people’s everyday lives and futures. As a result, we have a strong connection between theory and practice and play a role in a great number of national and international collaborations.

Research

The department is structured around three research units: Science and Technology Studies, Interactive Design, and Digital Aesthetics and Culture. These are cross-disciplinary fields involving research in organisations, communication, IT, design, society and technology; with research topics covering areas such as health IT, interaction processes, systems development, interface culture, surveillance, IT in urban spaces, and IT and business.

Degree programmes

Our degree programmes in digital design and information studies are deeply anchored in research in the department, and enthusiastic students have the opportunity of getting involved in research projects and student jobs. Our degree programmes are based at Katrinebjerg and form part of a wider, dynamic IT community with neighbours such as Google and B&O.

You can learn more about the content of our degree programmes in the study guide.

Digital Design

Information Studies

You can also visit the study portal for enrolled students

Staff

Lars Bo Andersen

Research Assistant

Lise Lotte Beck Andersen

Student Worker
H 5335

Jens Christensen

!!Lektor emeritus

Kasper Skov Christensen

Research Assistant

Geoff Cox

Associate professor

Peter Dalsgaard

Jens Christian Skou fellow

Eva Eriksson

Associate professor

Raune Frankjær

Scientific Assistant

Jonas Ørbæk Hansen

Project Manager CTIMNAT

Adriënne Heijnen

Senior scientific advisor

Peter Lauritsen

Professor with Special Responsibilities

Recent publications

Upcoming events

News

Dream Banking: The challenge: Lots of people have dreams, but not everyone bothers to find out whether they have enough money to achieve them. Solution: An app which shows people their dreams and how much money they have saved – how close are they to achieving their target? As a bonus, the bank gains invaluable insight into its clients and can improve the advice it provides.
The Charitable Micro Donation: The challenge: People rarely have any cash in their pockets these days, and this is a challenge for charities. How can you collect money from people under such circumstances? Solution: An app that allows you to donate a small amount of money each time you perform a transaction in Mobile Pay. You can choose between various charities, and you can change the amount donated as well. 

Albert: The challenge: How can we teach our children the value of money when they never see any actual notes and coins? Solution: A digital piggy bank called Albert – a joint piggy bank for the entire family. Parents can access it via their smartphones and identify shared targets for which the family can save up. Children have a contactless card so they can see how much money the family has saved so far.

THE ONE-STOP ECONOMY EXPERIENCE: The challenge: Financial decisions often give rise to anxiety and doubt. Have you made the right decision or not? Lots of bank clients do their own research – or hesitate to make investments they are uncertain about. Solution: A web app which gives users a clear view of the whole process, teaching them when to think with their hearts – and when to think with their brains.     

SAVE IT BY CASH: The challenge: Lots of young people have a savings account, but they don’t necessarily make regular deposits. How can we develop a healthy attitude to saving money among young people? Solution: A digital piggy bank which can only be accessed by the user’s fingerprint. Owners can set targets for how much they want to save. They can keep an eye on developments visually in the box.

2017.06.08 | Students, Afd. for Digital Design og Informationsvidenskab

Students designing the digital payment systems of the future

Students of digital design from Aarhus University presented a panel of developers from Danske Bank with their ideas about the digital payment systems of the future and how the Danes perceive money. Increasing digitalisation means that our banks need new skills to rethink the payment systems of the future.

Photo: SynchroniCity/Tom Blockley

2017.02.23 | Research, Afd. for Digital Design og Informationsvidenskab

Aarhus University to head giant global project on technology in future cities

EU issues major grant to associate professor Martin Brynskov and the beacon project SynchroniCity. This gives Aarhus University a leading role in developing the Internet of Things in cities, and a unique opportunity to work with a global consortium to influence the current process of digitalisation.

2016.12.01 | Afd. for Digital Design og Informationsvidenskab

Turn On Literature: A new EU-project involving the Poetry Machines

A new EU-project includes a further development, distribution and translation of the Poetry Machines. Two new partners join in – a library in Norway and a library in Romania.

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The decennial Aarhus conference – August 2015

The decennial Aarhus conference – August 2015

1975-1985-1995-2005 — the decennial Aarhus conferences have traditionally been instrumental for setting new agendas for critically engaged thinking about information technology. The fifth decennial Aarhus conference, Critical Alternatives, aims to set new agendas for theory and practice in computing for quality of human life.

The conference series is fundamentally interdisciplinary and emphasizes thinking that is firmly anchored in action, intervention, and scholarly critical practice. With the title Critical Computing – between sense and sensibility, the 2005 edition of the conference marked that computing was rapidly seeping into everyday life. In 2015, we see critical alternatives in alignment with utopian principles—that is, the hope that things might not only be different but also radically better. At the same time, radically better alternatives don’t emerge out of nowhere: they emerged from contested analyses of the mundane present and demand both commitment and labor to work towards them. Critical alternatives matter and make people reflect. 

Read more about the conference

Follow our research in APRJA – “A Peer-Reviewed Journal About”

Follow our research in APRJA – “A Peer-Reviewed Journal About”

APRJA is an open-access research journal that addresses the ever-shifting thematic frameworks of digital culture. APRJA stands for “A Peer-Reviewed Journal About” and invites the addition of a research topic to address what is considered to be key aspects of contemporary digital art and culture.

Read the New issue: Datafied Research Volume 4, Issue 1, 2015.

Students designing for the future

Students designing for the future

At the Department of Digital Design and Information Studies we help our students to meet the business community and find out what it’s like to be an entrepreneur.

For instance, once a year our students are challenged to compose a design that solves a social problem. During this process they gain contact with interest groups, have prototypes developed at design companies, and test the resulting products on a test panel. Finally, they present their designs at a trade fair which is evaluated by experts in entrepreneurship.

Read more about the latest trade fair: Design Expo 2015 (in Danish only)

New telemedicine research network 

New telemedicine research network 

Researchers at the Department of Digital Design and Information Studies work on the interaction between people and IT, which is why they have been included in Aarhus University’s new focus area: an interdisciplinary telemedicine research network. The main idea of the network is that it should be open and inclusive to ensure that everyone with an interest in telemedicinal solutions can take part – including not only people at Aarhus University, but also companies and other external stakeholders.

Read more about the research network (in Danish only)

Interactive Terracotta Warrior

Interactive Terracotta Warrior

The researchers at the Department of Digital Design and Information Studies are often involved in external collaboration. For instance, they added an interactive dimension to Moesgaard Museum’s exhibition about the terracotta warriors.

To illustrate the fact that the terracotta warriors of emperor Qin Shi Huangdi’s tomb were all painted, CAVI in collaboration with Moesgaard Museum made an interactive part of the temporary exhibition, “The First Emperor – China’s Terracotta Army”, which ran April 1 - September 30, 2015.

Read more about the exhibition and what the researchers have done.