Stylistics, Text Analysis and Cognitive Science

Master Class 

 

with Dr. Catherine Emmott
(University of Glasgow, Scotland)

Stylistics, Text Analysis
and Cognitive Science

11th May – 13th May 2015

Introduction

A master class on “Stylistics, Text Analysis and Cognitive Science” will be given by Dr. Catherine Emmott  11-13 May. Venue: Building 1483, loc. 251. All MA students in Cognitive Semiotics and Linguistics are invited to participate (registration necessary – see below).

Catherine Emmott is a Reader in the Department of English Language at the University of Glasgow, where she has been based since 1989.

Catherine Emott is Director of the STACS Project – Stylistics, Text Analysis and Cognitive Science: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Nature of Reading This project is run jointly with Emeritus Professor A.J. Sanford of the University of Glasgow’s Psychology Department. The project combines stylistic analysis and empirical testing to investigate topics attention-controlling devices, perspective, and reference items in narrative. In 2012, she published Mind, Brain and Narrative (Cambridge University Press) with A.J. Sanford. This book includes a discussion of the empirical work of the project and other key topics, including chapters on scenario-mapping theory and inferences, counterfactuals and figurative language, foregrounding and attention, embodiment, perspective, emotion and persuasion.

Catherine Emmott’s main research interests are in the mental processing of text, discourse anaphora, and stylistics. Her major study of reference theory and narrative processing, Narrative Comprehension: A Discourse Perspective (Oxford University Press), appeared in 1997. This book draws on insights from discourse analysis and artificial intelligence to build a detailed model of how readers build, maintain and use mental representations of fictional contexts, and how they keep track of characters and contexts within a complex, changing fictional world. The book shows how mental representations can supply the information necessary to interpret antecedentless pronouns in narrative. Dr. Emmott has also published many articles on text analysis, stylistics, and reference theory. She has been involved in developing the area within Stylistics called Cognitive Stylistics (also known as Cognitive Poetics) and has contributed to several key edited volumes in this area.  

The master class will organized in two sessions each day. The morning sessions consist of lectures, the afternoon sessions of workshops in which participants are asked to make specific exercises. Workshop material will be emailed to registered participants. Please consult the schedule here: 

Participation is free, but in order for us to better organize the event you are asked to sign upby sending an email to norfln@dac.au.dk latest by May 6.

 

Dates

Monday 11th May 2015 to Wednesday 13th May 2015

Venue

Building 1483, loc. 251 

 

Program

Monday 11th May 2015: 
Foregrounding and Attention

9:00-10.00

Stylistics: Core principles and new directions

10:15-11:00

Empirical work on text change detection and attention

11:15-12:00

Attention manipulation in detective fiction

12:00-1:00

Lunch

1.00-1.55

Workshop I: Foregrounding case study: Analysing and interpreting form and function

2:10-3:00

Workshop II: Aesthetic uses of foregrounding in literature

 

Tuesday 12th May 2015: 
Inferences, Knowledge and Aesthetics

9:00-10.00

Inferences, knowledge and story interpretation

10:15-11:00

Empirical work on scenarios and characters

11:15-12:00

Applications of schema theory: Analysing humour and literary texts

12:00-1:00

Lunch

1.00-1.55

Workshop I: Schema theory and the analysis of narrative

2:10-3:00

Workshop II: “Mind style” in literature

 

Wednesday 13th May 2015:
Text Worlds, Anaphora and Perspective

9:00-10.00

Text worlds and anaphora (Part I)

10:15-11:00

Text worlds and anaphora (Part II)

11:15-12:00

Ways of seeing: Granularity, perspective and distance in narratives

12:00-1:00

Lunch

1.00-1.55

Workshop I: Granularity, perspective and distance in narratives

2:10-3:00

Workshop II: Narrative progression in a short story