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Friday Lecure: Robotic Musicianship: Playing together with artificially creative machines.

Lecture by professor and founding director of Georgia Tech Center for Music Technology, Gil Weinberg.

2019.09.11 | Tina Pabst

Date Fri 27 Sep
Time 14:00 16:00
Location Peter Bøgh Andersen Auditorium, Finlandsgade 21, 8200 Aarhus

Abstract

The Robotic Musicianship research at Georgia Tech Center for Music Technology (GTCMT) focuses on the construction of autonomous and wearable robots that can analyze, reason, and generate music. The goal of our research is to facilitate meaningful and inspiring musical interactions between humans and artificially creative machines.  The term Robotic Musicianship refers to the intersection of the fields of Musical Mechatronics, which is the study and construction of physical systems that generate sound through mechanical means and Machine Musicianship, which focuses on developing algorithms and cognitive models that represent various aspects of music perception, theory, composition, performance, and interaction. Research in Robotic Musicianship at Georgia Tech focuses on the design of autonomous and wearable music-playing robots with underlying musical intelligence that can support performance and creative  interaction between humans and machines. In this talk I present the work conducted by the Robotic Musicianship Group at GTCMT over the last 15 years, highlighting the motivation, research questions, platforms, methods, and underlining guidelines for our work. 

Bio

Gil Weinberg is a professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Music and the founding director of the Georgia Tech Center for Music Technology, where he leads the Robotic Musicianship group. His research focuses on developing artificial creativity and musical expression for robots and augmented humans. Among his projects are a marimba playing robotic musician called Shimon that uses machine learning for jazz improvisation, and a prosthetic robotic arm for amputees that restores and enhances human drumming abilities. Weinberg has presented his work worldwide in venues such as The Kennedy Center, The World Economic Forum, Ars Electronica, Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt Museum, SIGGRAPH, TED-Ed, DLD and others. His music has been performed with orchestras such as Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, the National Irish Symphony Orchestra, and the Scottish BBC Symphony while his research has been disseminated through numerous journal articles and patents. Weinberg received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Media Arts and Sciences from MIT and his B.A. from the interdisciplinary program for fostering excellence in Tel Aviv University.

Co-organizer "Center for Participatory InformationTechnology" - http://pit.au.dk/

Lecture / talk, Afd. for Digital Design og Informationsvidenskab